Sea Parsley: mild parsley/celery taste, a little bitter and salty.

Sea Parsley thrives in harsh conditions along Australia’s Southern Ocean coastline on sand dunes and between cracks in rocks just above the high tide line, right on the beach.

Sea Parsley, also know as Sea Celery can be used in salads and soups.It is best used as a flavouring in the same way as regular parsley is used. Captain Cook made use of this plant to prevent scurvy when “The Endeavour” visited the east coast of Australia and New Zealand in 1770 and it was subsequently used by early settlers as a source of greens.  In fact, colonists in Albany W.A. were the first to cultivate it.

Chicken Ragu Fettucine

Ingredients
1 x 1.8kg Free Range Chicken
100ml Macadamia Nut Oil or Light Olive Oil
1 dspn dried Sea Parsley
1 tspn dried Native Thyme
1/2 tspn dried Native Sage
1 tspn dried Lemon Myrtle
1 tspn dried Mountain Pepperleaf
100ml Tomato Puree
3 x 400gm cans diced tomato
1 1/2 cans of water
10gm Bush Tomato seasoning
1 stick celery (cubed)
1 carrot (cubed)
1 onion (diced)
3 cloves garlic (minced)
3 rashers of bacon (diced)

Mix 80ml of oil with Sea Parsley, Native Thyme, Native Sage, Lemon Myrtle and Mountain Pepperleaf. Massage on and in the chicken and place on baking tray. Into the oven at 180C for about 80 minutes, turning every 20 minutes.

Meanwhile into a pot place the rest of the oil, bacon, carrot, celery and garlic and cook for 5 minutes before adding, the puree, tomatoes, bush tomato seasoning and water. Cook for 20 minutes and then turn off and allow to rest.

When the chicken is cooked and is cool enough to handle pull the flesh off the bone and place into the tomato sauce.

Tip: This recipe is best made in advance to allow the flavours to infuse.

Cook pasta as per packet instructions. Mix through the sauce. Serve with grated Parmesan or Pecorino cheese and fresh green salad.

Tips for 2nd and 3rd day hair

Second and third day hair

Bed time pineappling – Clip (not hair elastic) your hair up to resemble a pineapple with all your curls piled up on top of your head with the clip at the crown of your head. If you’re a tosser this will stop knots and tangles whilst creating more volume.

Switch to a silk or satin pillowcase which is smoother and so there is less friction on your hair and therefore less frizz.

Steamy shower – In the morning, give your curls a shake and have a steamy shower  to rehydrate your hair without having to wet it too much. Alternatively you can use a water spray bottle to dampen and reshape any curls that need it. Apply some Jessicurl Oil Blend to smooth your curls.

If there are any tangles or flat curls then use Jessicurl Awe Inspiraling Spray to plump them up again.

What’s your trick to revive 2nd day curls back to their original glory?

Saltbush – vegetable or seasoning?

Travellers into our dry inland can either see 360 degrees of flat featureless plain or look closer and discover the pale green sprawling long lived grey-blue shrub growing up to 3 metres high and sometimes spreads to 5 metres wide known as Old Man Saltbush.

Many farmers favour the saltbush paddocks for their lambs in their final 3 months where grazing on the shrub produces a tender, low fat meat.

In old times indigenous Australians mostly collected the minute Saltbush seeds to grind and roast for damper. The dried Saltbush flakes are a wonderful addition to meat rubs, bread, grills, pasta and dukkah.

Fresh leaves are superb in a stir fry.

KYLIE KWONG’S STIR FRIED NATIVE LEAVES

3 tbsp peanut oil
1/2 tsp salt flakes
3 cloves garlic, crushed
200g fresh salt bush leaves
2 tbsp organic tamari
3 tbsp stock
1/2 tsp sesame oil

DIRECTIONS

Heat the peanut oil in a hot wok until surface seems to shimmer slightly.

Add the salt and garlic and stir-fry for 30 seconds.

Add the salt bush leaves and stir-fry for 3 minutes.

Add the tamari and stir-fry for 1 minute.

Add the stock and stir-fry further 1 minute, then add the sesame oil.

Serve immediately as part of a banquet.

Oven baked Corn & Saltbush Chipssaltbush-corn-chips

Preheat oven to 200C (180C fan forced oven).

Combine a cup of polenta, 2/3 cup plain flour, 1 tbspn dried saltbush flakes and 1 teaspn baking powder in a bowl and add 1/4 cup macadamia oil and 1/2 cup of cold water. Mix well.

Divide the mixture in half and roll each half out separately between two sheets of baking paper until very thin (1mm).

Cut into triangles. Bake for 15 minutes or until crisp.

Curlies have the best of both worlds

Us curlies have the best of  both worlds because we can choose to go curly or straight however for straighties no amount of gel, wax, hairspray, sea salt sprays or deluxe curling iron techniques will give the hair any kind of lift, wave, curl or body. Those gels will weigh the hair down and make it look greasy and those “curls” will inevitably die.

All over the world bathrooms are filled with gels, waxes, hairsprays and sea salt sprays that have never been used more than once because those sneaky commercials persuaded straighties to believe in miracles.

Straight hair is flat, lifeless and boring. Straight hair is straight.  It tangles easily.  Gets plastered to the head when it rains.  Knots into a tangled mess in the wind. It is more prone to static and you can’t disguise roots that are growing out.  It lacks volume, even when you cut it short, it still ends up flattening. You can try to tousle it around and flip it upside down a million times while you blow dry it, but 10 minutes later, it will inevitably fall flat on your face.  It is also usually thin, which means aging and hair loss become partners in expediting the process aided and abetted by curling or straightening.

All us curlies really need to do is control the frizz, encourage and define the curl.  Looking sensational is a lot easier when you are a curly!

Most importantly is that straight hair does not enhance the beauty of a curly.  Curlies are meant to be curly and that’s that!

  • You always stand out in a crowd
  • Naturally curly hair is always styled and ready to go
  • Curly hair has more body and volume
  • Curly hair is fun and unique
  • Naturally curly hair is super versatile

Peppermint Gum goes well with Lemon Myrtle & Sandalwood

Peppermint Gum, was initially found around the Blue Mountains and then west through the Great Dividing Range and south along the range into Victoria, as far as Ballarat.

Its minty overtones are excellent in tea, desserts, cakes & savoury dishes. As well as into sauces, pie crusts & stuffings for meat dishes.

A favourite for brewing Australian billy tea over a campfire, a handful of peppermint gum leaves were added to the pot.

Lemon Myrtle Cheesecake on a base of Peppermint Gum and Native Nuts

For the base, combine 1 cup butternut snap biscuits crushed, 1/2 cup macadamias ground, 1/2 cup roasted sandalwood nuts ground, 1 tspn peppermint gum powder, 125 g butter melted and then press into a dish to form a base.  Refrigerate.

Dissolve 2 tspns gelatine powder in 60 mls hot water and allow to cool

For the filling, blend 125 gm soft butter, 250 gm cream cheese softened, 1 cup caster sugar, 2 tspns vanilla essence, 2 Tbspns ground lemon myrtle, until creamy.

Gradually add gelatine to the filling mix.  Beat until light and fluffy.

Pour over the biscuit base and place in the fridge overnight.

Peppermint Gum Tea

Makes 2 cups
1. Heat 3 cups of good quality water to boiling.
2. 1 rounded teaspoon of Peppermint Gum flakes into the infuser or strainer.
3. Pour about 2 cups of boiling water over the infuser and into the pot. Let the Peppermint filled infuser steep for 2-3 minutes. Close your eyes and inhale the delicious aroma . . . by the time your tea is ready, you’ll feel relaxed and energized, even before you drink it!

Variation: Pour it over ice in a tall glass, and sip slowly. Iced Peppermint tea is a great summer beverage.

Peppermint Chocolate Truffles

Ingredients:peppermint gum truffles
50gm butter
3/4 cup icing sugar
180gm chocolate
1 desertspoon Peppermint Gum
150gm Macadamia Nuts
2 Tablespoons Cream

Place first 5 ingredients into a bowl and melt over a saucepan of hot water. Then add the nuts and cream. Mix well. Drop spoonfuls into paper patty pans. Refrigerate to set.

 

PEPPERMINT GUM POWDER AND TEA FLAKES ARE AVAILABLE IN THE TASTE AUSTRALIA BUSH FOOD SHOP>>

Benefits of a warm oil scalp massage once a week

It lubricates and conditions the scalp, helping to prevent flakes and dry scalp.

It helps enhance blood circulation in the head and neck area. When the scalp is “tight” from stress, circulation and hair growth are impeded.

It helps relax the scalp and increase pliability

It helps strengthen the roots of the hair and nourishes the hair-shafts, promoting new hair growth and strengthening current hair.

It helps soften and condition the hair, making it more manageable.

It spreads the natural oils of the hair, increasing hair lustre and vibrancy.

It helps protect hair from the damaging effects of the sun and harsh weather by improving resiliency over time.

It is replenishing and rejuvenating for dry, damaged hair, and helps prevent excessive brittleness and split-ends.

It is wonderfully relaxing for the mind and nervous system.

It also helps reduce body heat in general, especially if you have been up late a few nights or your eyes are smarting from too much close work on the computer or reading.

It helps promote emotional balance.

Relaxes the muscles in the neck area and can help promote sound sleep at night.

Each ingredient in Jessicurl Stimulating Scalp Massage Oil is known for its hair growth properties and it feels REALLY good to do a scalp massage with it. While it won’t re-grow hair on a bald head, it can encourage healthy hair growth for people who still have hair. The essential oils will impart a lovely tingling sensation to your scalp and the other oils in it will make your curls amazingly soft.

Apply to scalp and massage for 10-15 minutes.
To turn it into a hot oil treatment, use with heat. Leave in for 30-60 minutes then wash out.

SuzeeBlu.com.au knows you want the right product for your curls yesterday so all orders completed by noon and posted that day.

Gloriously aromatic Native Thyme

This strongly aromatic bush is a native to south east New South Wales, eastern Victoria and Tasmania.

Native Thyme was used by indigenous Australians for its medicinal properties.

Use as you would Mediterranean Thyme.  It is particularly good when mixed with Artesian Salt, Minced Garlic, Macadamia Nut Oil and Breadcrumbs as a crusting.

Unlike traditional thyme, this ingredient has a complex flavour based on mint. Try it as a baked potato spice, a red meat rub or BBQ marinade.  Or add  1/4 tspn dried Native Thyme to Lemon Curd!

 

Lamb with Native Thyme Desert Lime and Peppermint Gum

  • 1  deboned lamb leg
  • 1 desertspoon dried Native Thyme
  • 1 desertspoon dried Peppermint Gum
  • 6 fresh Desert Limes sliced or juice and zest of 1 lemon
  • 3 large garlic cloves crushed
  • 3 tablespoons Macadamia oil
  • Pinch each of Artesian salt and ground Pepperberry

Feta and Watermelon salad

  • 3 cups cubed watermelon
  • 1 small red onion peeled and finely sliced
  • 1 Lebanese cucumber peeled and roughly cut
  • 2 tablespoons macadamia oil
  • juice of ½ a lemon
  • 1 tablespoon fresh mint finely sliced
  • 50g feta cheese cubed
  • Artesian salt and ground Pepperberry

Desert Lime Tzatziki

350gm natural no-fat yoghurt

2 Lebanese cucumbers, deseeded, grated

2 garlic cloves, crushed

1 tspsn Desert Lime powder

1 Tbspn Lime juice

1 teaspoon pepper

1 teaspoon salt

Using a small bowl mix the macadamia oil, Native Thyme, Peppermint Gum, Desert Limes, garlic, Artesian salt and Pepperberry. Place the lamb in a ceramic dish and coat thoroughly with the herb mix. Cover and marinate in the fridge for up to 24 hours.

Desert Lime Tzatziki – Combine all ingredients. Cover and refrigerate until required. Best made ahead of time to allow the flavours to develop

Preheat the oven to 200C or the BBQ to medium high. Place the lamb on either an iron griddle or large oven proof frying pan on a medium hot heat or the grill section of your BBQ. Cook on both sides to seal for about 2 minutes, then either place the pan in the oven or close the BBQ lid for 15-20 minutes (this is for medium rare, cook for longer if you prefer your lamb more done). When the lamb is cooked to your liking, remove from the heat & allow to rest in a warm place for 5-10 minutes.

Feta and Watermelon salad: While the lamb is resting, throw the salad ingredients together in a medium bowl with the oil , lemon juice and salt & pepper mix well then top with the feta and herbs.

Slice lamb and serve with the salad, Native Thyme & Saltbush Breadsticks and Desert Lime Tzatziki .

Serves 4 people

Native Thyme & Saltbush Breadsticks

1 sheet frozen puff pastry dough

1 egg white, beaten

1 tablespoon freshly grated lemon zest

3/4 teaspoon dried Native thyme

3/4 teaspoon saltbush

Preheat oven to 180C.

Thaw 1 sheet puff pastry dough according to package directions, and place it on a lightly floured work surface.

Brush pastry with beaten egg white, then sprinkle with lemon zest, Native Thyme, and Saltbush.

Cut into 1cm wide strips with a pizza cutter; transfer to a parchment paper-lined baking sheet.

Bake for 14-15 minutes or until lightly browned.

The wonderfully versatile Strawberry Gum

Strawberry Gum is a very rare tree originally from a small region of New South Wales. The leaves have an essential oil called Methyl cinnamate, which acts as a flavour enhancer to sweet or savoury dishes.

It will enhance the flavour of berries, tomato based sauces, dairy or coconut milk dishes and  has a great affinity with chocolate.  It makes wonderful truffles, as well as aromatic sauces for poultry, pork, lamb or beef.

Combine with chilli in seafood recipes, or sprinkle over sweet potato before roasting.  It can even be used as a cure for crocodile.

Pair with vanilla bean for a lovely compote of poached fruit.

Add to a cheesecake base, fruit crumble topping, muesli energy bar, herbal tea infusion.

Iced Strawberry Gum tea is a great base for a fruity cocktail (recipe in our December newsletter).

The leaves are high in antioxidants and are anti-fungal and antibiotic, assisting with the microflora balance of the gut.

Strawberry Gum Custard Meringue

Custard:

  1.     8 whole dried Strawberry Gum leaves or 2 tbsp dried crushed leaves
  2.     6 free range egg yolks
  3.     1 cup cream
  4.     1 cup milk
  5.     150gm sugar

Heat milk, cream, sugar and leaves in a saucepan until boiling point. Turn off heat and allow flavours to infuse for minimum of 15 minutes (the longer the better).  Remove the leaves and return flavoured milk to a clean saucepan. Whisk in the eggs and increase heat slowly, whisky constantly until mixture thickens to coat the back of a wooden spoon. Take off heat and cool, refrigerate.

Meringue:

  1. 6 free range egg whites
  2. 300g caster sugar
  3. 1 tsp white vinegar
  4. 3 tsp strawberry gum powder

Cut out a circle (about 20–25cm) of baking paper. Place on a baking tray.
Preheat oven to 100C
Place the egg white into a mixxing bowl and whisk until soft peaks form.  Then gradually add the remaining ingredients and combine.
Pile the mixture into the baking paper circle and spread evenly to the edges. (A dip in the middle helps contain the custard filling).
Bake for 90 minutes and then  turn off the oven and let it cool completely in the oven before removing.
Assemble just before serving.  Fill with custard and serve with seasonal fruit (shown here with current season fresh Cherries and Davidsons Plums – the tartiness of the plum cuts through the sweetness)

 

Potassium Rich Bush Tomato

I know that many of you are already fans of the Australian native Bush Tomato.

Bush Tomatoes (Solanum Centrale) are just one of many foods occurring naturally in Australia’s Red Centre. The fruit belongs to the family Solanaceae which includes some of the world’s major food crops: potato, tomato, capsicum, eggplant and chilli. However of the 18 species occurring across central Australia, only half are edible so identification is a must. I love to add a pinch when I’m mashing an avocado for a toast topper.

Harvesting occurs between March and August and whilst most used to be gathered from the wild these days they are being successfully farmed making availability less of an issue than another member of the Solanaceae family, Passionberries (Solanum cleistogamum), that grows on the edge of the desert.

Bush Tomato has a strong sun dried tomato, caramel and tamarillo flavour and aroma which is just delicious in recipes with tomato, cheese or eggs. Also goes well with Salmon and stronger flavoured white or game meats. Can be used as a Dukkah or crusting for meats.

Buy Whole and Crushed Bush Tomato >>HERE>>

Bush Tomato infused Vinegar

Use a good quality vinegar. (white wine, balsamic, red wine, rice wine, or apple cider vinegar)
Place 3 tablespoons of whole bush tomato into a clean sterilized jar or bottle
Heat 600ml vinegar to just below boiling,then pour over the bush tomato and cap tightly.
Allow to stand for 3 to 4 weeks for the flavour to develop fully.
Strain the vinegar through a damp cheesecloth or coffee filter one or more times until the vinegar is no longer cloudy.
Discard the bush tomato.
Pour the strained vinegar into a clean sterilized jar.
Seal tightly.
Store in the refrigerator for best flavour retention. Use in cooking in equal amounts where wine, fruit juice, plain vinegar, lemon, or lime juice is called for.

Rastafarianism

Rastafari is a religion which developed in Jamaica in the 1930s, following the coronation of Haile Selassie I as Emperor of Ethiopia in 1930. Its adherents worship him in much the same way as Jesus in his Second Advent, or as God the Son.

International awareness of Rastafari grew in the 1970s as a result of the popularity of reggae music, and especially the international success of singer/songwriter Bob Marley. By 1997 there were, according to one estimate, around one million Rastafari worldwide.

Rastafari are monotheists, worshiping a singular God whom they call Jah. Jah is the term in the King James Bible, Psalms 68:4. Rastas view Jah in the form of the Holy Trinity – Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit. Rastas say that Jah in the form of the Holy Spirit (incarnate) lives within the human.

The wearing of dreadlocks is very closely associated with the movement, though not universal among, nor exclusive to, its adherents.

Rastafari associate dreadlocks with a spiritual journey that one takes in the process of locking their hair (growing hairlocks). It is taught that patience is the key to growing locks, a journey of the mind, soul and spirituality. Its spiritual pattern is aligned with the Rastafari movement. The way to form natural dreadlocks is to allow hair to grow in its natural pattern, without cutting, combing or brushing, but simply to wash it with pure water and herbal shampoo.