Deva Cut or Rezo Cut

Which Curly Hair-Cutting Method Is Right For You?

All curls are not one size fits all. Deciding on which technique you should have depends on your curls.

Deva Cut

A Dry Cutting Technique done on dry curly hair, never texturizing or thinning the hair because slicing into the interior of a curly haircut has the potential to create frizz. By cutting the hair dry, in its natural state, stylists are able to cut the curls where they live naturally, and thus create a beautiful shape.

Curl pattern and density are analysed to determine where on the head to begin elevating and creating layers.

Rëzo Cut

Whilst the DevaCut focusses on framing your face, the RezoCut maintains an even length all the way around your head. It liberates the curls from the root area so they can move about freely which means if you straighten a DevaCut, your hair may appear to be uneven, while the RezoCut will look even in both a curly and straightened state. The RezoCut is perfect for curlies who love their length, as it creates a shape while maintaining both length and volume.

Yikes I’m still frizzy

I know you want to see instant results but it can take a few weeks to get your hair back to good condition after years of using hair care products laden with nasties.

Don’t touch your hair too often because it transfers oils from your fingertips.

Don’t over wash.  Yes you wash it to cleanse the grease but no it doesn’t help.  Daily shampooing can strip your scalp of natural oils so your scalp produces more.  Try cutting back to every other day at least or 2 to 3 times a week.  (Right now I haven’t washed my hair for 7 days).  Your hair will thank you in the long run.

Don’t over condition.  You may be applying a conditioner that’s too heavy for your hair type or you may not be washing it out properly.   I use Deep Conditioner on my fine hair more as a leave in.  I smooth a small amount over the canopy focussing on the ends.

Check out Jess’s video on using the Light and Luminous product collection
https://youtu.be/Y7KCldodunk

Hope this helps and you have a curly day

Davidsons Plum Paste on your next cheese platter

Davidson Plum Paste (The Cook & the Chef)

Ingredients

¼ cup water

885gm Davidson Plum puree

885g sugar

2 teaspoons aniseed myrtle

1 tablespoon lemon juice

Puree plums in blender or food processor. In a large heavy pot, pour in the water & plums. Stir in the sugar, then the aniseed myrtle and the lemon juice.

Cook on a high heat, stirring continually, for about 20 min. It’s ready when it’s just short of being toffee.

Pour into a shallow dish. Allow to cool & set. This keeps if well sealed.

Serve spoonfuls of paste with strong sharp cheese & walnut toast.

Geraldton Wax finds a place in our kitchens

This iconic Australian plant native to Western Australia, loves a dry climate.  The flowers are used extensively in arrangements but the highly aromatic leaves have found a place in our kitchen.

Geraldton Wax adds a citrusy flavour to your beverages and meals.

Classed as Australia’s version of kaffir lime.

PURCHASE HERE

 

How to leave a hairdresser feeling like a million bucks

One of the first questions a hairdresser should ask is how much of your hair you want to keep. He/she should show you anything that needs attention—like uneven pieces or damaged ends. Explain what is wrong and give you options on how to make it look even and better.

When you see another curly with pretty and healthy hair ask them the name of their stylist. That’s usually the best referral system.

Team up with your hairstylist to examine your hair so you both understand the real condition of your curls and ask them for suggestions on how to fix your issues.

If the salons Facebook or Instagram page doesn’t show pics of their work then ask them in person.

And of course RUN if a stylist tries to brush or comb wet curls prior to the cut. Run from thinning shears or razors. And RUN from those who want to straighten your hair before cutting. They should only use quality shears that produce clean, blunt cuts.

My Curly Hair routine

People ask me all the time to tell them exactly what I do to my hair to make it look “so perfect all the time.” I might disagree that it looks perfect ALL the time, but I’m happy to share my routine just the same. 🙂

A few times a week I put in a dime sized puddle of Oil Blend For Softer Hair and leave it in overnight and once a week I use my Deep Conditioning Treatment to provide extra moisture. I get little trims every 3-4 months to take care of any dead ends and re-shape it. If I don’t, my hair turns triangular pretty fast.  🙂

Ok, now for my daily routine.

I wash it every 2-3 days with either >>>>MORE>>

Incorporating bush food in your daily life

If native foods are to become mainstream, we need to use them in our home cooking. Many plants are known by their traditional or botanic origins. In some cases it is difficult to understand what they are or what you are supposed to do with them……..grind it and use it as a sauce; cook as a thick spinach; boil and serve as a root vegetable; eat as a fresh fruit or preserve as a jam?

>>MORE>>

Sustainable supply of paperbark

Indigenous Australians have used paperbark to provide shelter, in artwork and to cook with for thousands of years but not many know how much and how often you can harvest a tree without killing it.

Up until a couple of years ago there was such a man but ill health forced him to stop and he was not able to persuade his children to take over.

But now an Aboriginal owned and worked property in the far north of Australia has begun to harvest 100 year old trees on the property to supply the market.

It will take 2 years for the thick bark to grow back and be ready again for harvesting.

Taste Australia Bush Food Shop has secured sheets of paperbark to sell and they will be available HERE once they make the long long trip from the remotest corner of the country.

Jess tells: “How much product should you use”

Hi Jess,
My hair is 3a-3b — straighter/wavy and frizz-prone on top layer and curlier underneath. My hair is about medium thickness.  When dry, my length varies from mid-neck and mid-ear level.

I have been using about 4-5 quarter-size puddles of the CCSS with RR lately. I usually put RR on to cover all of my hair (4-5 quarter size puddles of RR, too), to the point that it feels smooth when wet. Perhaps I need to cut back on the CCSS? It distributes easier than it looks like it will, so maybe I have been using too much…?

Answer: Yep, it sounds to me like you’re using WAY too much of both RR and CCSS. I would cut back to 3 puddles of RR and 2 puddles of CCSS – and even THAT might be too much for your length – you might only need one puddle of CCSS. You’ll need to try it both ways and see.

For perspective, here’s how much I use. I make a mixture of CCSS and RR – about 3/4 RR and 1/4 CCSS. I use about 3 puddles of that in total, plus an additional quarter sized amount of CCSS. My hair sounds longer than yours and my hair is also VERY coarse and VERY thick.

So you have some experimenting to do. 😉 I’d suggest that tomorrow you try it with 3 puddles of RR and 2 puddles of CCSS. The next day try 2 puddles of RR and 1 puddle of CCSS, just to compare the differences.

NB An American quarter is bigger than an Aussie 10 cent but smaller than an Aussie 20 cent.

Easy and delicious.

Our Munducklin Curry Powder combines all the ingredients of a great curry with authentic native ingredients for a flavoursome meal.

 

The recipe for 2

  1. Preheat oven 160C
  2. Peel and finely slice 1 large red onion, 2 cloves garlic,  5cm ginger.
  3. Splash of olive oil in a pan. Add Tbspn Munducklin Curry Powder, teaspoon Tropical Pepperberry Sea Salt, half each of a red, green and yellow capsicum sliced.
  4. Cook until soft and golden (about 15 mins).
  1. Transfer to baking dish and add 1 can coconut milk, 1 Tbspn Finger Lime Caviar, 1 Tbspn lime juice.
  2. Mix well and then add 14 prawns (peeled and deveined) and lower 2 Atlantic Salmon fillets into mixture. Ensure all seafood is immersed.
  3. Bake 20 mins.
  4. Serve with steamed rice.